2016 Artists: Jesse Thistle

Jesse Thistle is Métis-Cree from Saskatchewan and a master’s student in history at the University of Waterloo.His work centres on trauma and memory within populations of Métis and Cree in Northern Saskatchewan, and the Algonquin of Timiskaming, Ontario. Specifically, he looks at how history can be applied to understand the effects of intergenerational trauma in contemporary Indigenous populations. His work is directed towards community healing and cultural reclamation as well as retrieval of oral history archives—termed as truth-telling as defined by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission—challenging orthodox settler histories in the narrative of Turtle Island. Jesse is also interested in how the arts—film, writing, dance, painting and illustration—can be used to as a mode of resistance, cultural revitalization, and land reclamation among Indigenous peoples.

Follow Jesse on Twitter: @michifMan

Find out more about Jesse & his work on his blog.

Join us for Unharvested Histories on Oct. 15th to view Jesse’s film, kiskisiwin – remembering, created in partnership with 2015 Staging Our Histories artist Martha Stiegman.

Good news! Unharvested Histories DEADLINE EXTENDED past long weekend!

GOOD NEWS for dancers, poets, musicians, film makers, students and historians who want to share lesser known histories off the page & on the stage: Staging Our Histories has extended the submission deadline for Unharvested Histories in Goderich to better accommodate our submitting artists.

Artist submissions will now be accepted until midnight on July 4th, 2016. If you haven’t already started a written or recorded proposal that outlines how you would bring #UnharvestedHistories to life on the stage or screen, you have one extra week to create material and pinpoint your technical needs. See our submission guidelines for more detailed information on what our co-organizers will be looking for when selecting pieces, and what to include in your proposal. For the 2016 event in Goderich, we’re seeking a diversity of storytelling mediums & performance styles, as well as diverse histories that matter to individuals and communities across Huron County and surrounding communities.

Prospective performers can submit early or send questions about their proposal for more detailed feedback and guidance from our co-directors. We’d love to hear from you! Email us at staginghistories@gmail.com, tweet us @stagehist or message us via Facebook.

 

 

Staging Our Histories Returns in 2016

The co-organizers of Staging Our Histories are pleased to announce that histories off the page will once again be taking the stage in 2016!

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In October 2016, Staging Our Histories comes to Goderich, Ontario on Lake Huron.

Future editions of Staging Our Histories will take place in new locations across the world, providing a platform for new and established local artists to present their diverse perspectives on unwritten histories. Our next live performance event and film screening will be the weekend of October 15th, in Goderich, Ontario. Thank you to our venues, the Livery theatre and the Huron County Museum, as well as the Huron Arts and Heritage Network for acting as our local partners in 2016.

In addition to returning artists from 2015, we’ll be welcoming original submissions from new dancers, storytellers, poets, playwrights, and filmmakers, especially those exploring the lesser known histories and communities of rural Ontario. Look for our call for submissions and further details about this year’s theme in the coming days! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for up-to-the-minute updates and news about other exciting projects near you that take history off the page.

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Artists talkback at the 2015 Staging Our Histories at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.

Questions about this year’s event? Contact us at staginghistories@gmail.com

Staging Our Histories at the National Arts Centre Box Office

Does the way we tell the story change our understanding of history?

Join the performers of Staging our Histories May 31st at the National Arts Centre to witness seven performances that bring new perspectives to the past and invite the audience to interact with history. Check out Staging Our Histories on the NAC’s website in English and French.

Eight powerful stories told via film, theatre, poetry and oral storytelling will illuminate the past and its impact on the present for one evening in Ottawa. At Staging Our Histories, creative storytelling will bring the origins of a local landmark to life, film and theatre will investigate the memories contained in a grandmother’s home remedies, and poetry will express the lived experience of colonial legacies, among other performances.

And mark your calendars! Tickets for Staging Our Histories are officially on sale at the National Arts Centre’s box office on April 6th at 10 am!

Martha Stiegman

Martha Stiegman is a passionate and engaged community-media and documentary filmmaker. Currently based in Toronto where she teaches at York University’s Faculty of Environmental Studies, her work has screened in festivals around the world from Tunisia and New Zealand to Brazil. Her first two documentaries, In Defense of our Treaties (2007) and The End of the Line (2007) explore alliances between Mi’kmaq and non-native fishing communities in her home province of Nova Scotia. Honour Your Word (2013) is an intimate, behind the blockades portrait of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake and their fight to defend their traditional lands. Indigenous struggles and non-native solidarity have been the focus of Martha’s film work, community-arts practice and academic research for more than ten years.