2016 Artists: Jesse Thistle

Jesse Thistle is Métis-Cree from Saskatchewan and a master’s student in history at the University of Waterloo.His work centres on trauma and memory within populations of Métis and Cree in Northern Saskatchewan, and the Algonquin of Timiskaming, Ontario. Specifically, he looks at how history can be applied to understand the effects of intergenerational trauma in contemporary Indigenous populations. His work is directed towards community healing and cultural reclamation as well as retrieval of oral history archives—termed as truth-telling as defined by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission—challenging orthodox settler histories in the narrative of Turtle Island. Jesse is also interested in how the arts—film, writing, dance, painting and illustration—can be used to as a mode of resistance, cultural revitalization, and land reclamation among Indigenous peoples.

Follow Jesse on Twitter: @michifMan

Find out more about Jesse & his work on his blog.

Join us for Unharvested Histories on Oct. 15th to view Jesse’s film, kiskisiwin – remembering, created in partnership with 2015 Staging Our Histories artist Martha Stiegman.

Good news! Unharvested Histories DEADLINE EXTENDED past long weekend!

GOOD NEWS for dancers, poets, musicians, film makers, students and historians who want to share lesser known histories off the page & on the stage: Staging Our Histories has extended the submission deadline for Unharvested Histories in Goderich to better accommodate our submitting artists.

Artist submissions will now be accepted until midnight on July 4th, 2016. If you haven’t already started a written or recorded proposal that outlines how you would bring #UnharvestedHistories to life on the stage or screen, you have one extra week to create material and pinpoint your technical needs. See our submission guidelines for more detailed information on what our co-organizers will be looking for when selecting pieces, and what to include in your proposal. For the 2016 event in Goderich, we’re seeking a diversity of storytelling mediums & performance styles, as well as diverse histories that matter to individuals and communities across Huron County and surrounding communities.

Prospective performers can submit early or send questions about their proposal for more detailed feedback and guidance from our co-directors. We’d love to hear from you! Email us at staginghistories@gmail.com, tweet us @stagehist or message us via Facebook.

 

 

Staging Our Histories Returns in 2016

The co-organizers of Staging Our Histories are pleased to announce that histories off the page will once again be taking the stage in 2016!

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In October 2016, Staging Our Histories comes to Goderich, Ontario on Lake Huron.

Future editions of Staging Our Histories will take place in new locations across the world, providing a platform for new and established local artists to present their diverse perspectives on unwritten histories. Our next live performance event and film screening will be the weekend of October 15th, in Goderich, Ontario. Thank you to our venues, the Livery theatre and the Huron County Museum, as well as the Huron Arts and Heritage Network for acting as our local partners in 2016.

In addition to returning artists from 2015, we’ll be welcoming original submissions from new dancers, storytellers, poets, playwrights, and filmmakers, especially those exploring the lesser known histories and communities of rural Ontario. Look for our call for submissions and further details about this year’s theme in the coming days! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for up-to-the-minute updates and news about other exciting projects near you that take history off the page.

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Artists talkback at the 2015 Staging Our Histories at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.

Questions about this year’s event? Contact us at staginghistories@gmail.com

7 Reasons to Experience History off the Page

Although math is not her strong suit, Co-Director Sinead Cox lists her top seven reasons to snag tickets for History (a)Live: 

ONE: THE TALENT                                                                                  StaginOurHistories

Our performers are multi-talented artists, storytellers, poets and filmmakers, and they actually constitute eight great reasons to be at the National Arts Centre on May 31st. Staging Our Histories brings this group of diverse amateur and professional artists together in the same room for the first (and probably only) time. Their artistic voices and perspectives on history are entirely original and distinct, but their pieces complement each other by asking similar questions about identity, memory and legacy.

TWO: IT’S NOT THE HISTORY YOU READ IN SCHOOL

Our organizers are interested in how stories and memories change across different mediums, and how performance can be a powerful platform for unwritten or unrecorded histories. Each of the seven histories presented on stage on May 31st is personal and revelatory, and interrogates how we share and forget the past on and off the page.

THREE: IT’S A PARTY

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Ticket-holders for Staging Our Histories are invited to a reception following the performances. There will be refreshments, snacks, and a chance to mingle with the performers and organizers.

FOUR: YOU CAN BE PART OF HISTORY

Staging Our Histories is a conversation, not a lecture. The evening’s discussion of performative histories will extend beyond the stage, as host Adrian Harewood moderates talkbacks between the artists and the audience. We hope theatre-lovers, students, historians, and just about everyone else, will be inspired by the convergence of history and performance, as we continue to be.

FIVE: THERE’S A CHANCE TO GET IN FOR FREE!

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You can win tickets to Staging Our Histories, and a copy of History, Memory, Performance, just by tweeting your favourite history experience to @stagehist with the contest hashtag #mylivehistory. 

SIX: RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE

Staging Our Histories happens at ‘Canada’s Stage’, the National Arts Centre, in lovely downtown Ottawa. It’s conveniently close if you’re in town that week to attend the 2015 Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Ottawa, or you’re taking part in the Walk for Reconciliation, also on May 31st.

SEVEN: THE (HISTORY) A(LIVE) TEAM

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Once again, this is six good reasons for the price of one. The Staging Our Histories organizers are volunteers motivated by the desire to expand public access to unconventional and thought-provoking histories. The co-directors and core volunteers are all recent grads or current students of Carleton University’s history program; they’re also keen, passionate about history, and a lot of fun to hang out with– so look for us at the reception after the show.

If you care to join us for a night of extraordinary performances, you can GET TICKETS NOW at the NAC’s box office.

Need another reason? Contact the co-directors with any questions at staginghistories@gmail.com!